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off the magnet. .. who are using undocumented workers. that will cut down the flow by about 90% of the border. that makes it possible to secure the border for those that are trying to come across for nefarious purposes for criminals enterprises. we can stop them at the border. then we say to those that are here in an undocumented status you are on probation paying a fine and this is to me what i find when i talk to people the most emotional issue in all of this is language. i find americans across the generations don't want us to have to sing the national anthem in two languages at the world series. they won the national anthem in english even if they were american. so they have to agree if they want to stay here permanently they have to agree to read, write and speak english. i find that among the undocumented workers they have no problem with this. they want to learn english. they understand that to live the american dream they have to learn to speak english. it's only liberals who inhabit college campuses and education departments who have a problem with english becoming the
security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently demonstrated the capability of advanced biofuels during massive exercise that featured a carrier strike gr
excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
-- there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us on the disaster not the least of them being the possibility of cyber warfare. that's something that television news ought to be covering big time right now. i am tremendously concerned by the fact that the american public and its military have never been as far apart as they are right now. a terrific job of covering everyone in uniform and hero. we did a terrific job of welcoming them at airports saying thank you for your service. we know nothing about what's going on in the military and for what's more, the military operations these days are being launched on the basis of drone attacks, cia operatives, special operations forces out in the field, and all of that backed by civilian employees, civilian contractors, and we know next to nothing that is brought by these. islamic because the reporting is not being done? >> it's because we found that keeping the american public won't stand for a draft and the professional military wasn't enough to fight all over the world else we are now -- we've been focused on afghanistan we actuall
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
nations, was the weight to get alongside these afghans, and we saw -- i was in kabul when the two u.s. officers were shot in the national military police coordination center in the moi. there was an absolute bizarre for those who were present on the day to -- doug touched on this as proximity with the afghans, and it's very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> [inaudible] >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful withdrawal of u.k. combat troops by the end of 2014. >> i absolutely understand the investments, and there's a lot of material. my headquarters absolutely understand how much we have got to move over the time? >> the overall general plan of withdrawal, will you be able to be successful do you think? >> yes, i will. noting, of course, that the national operation is inside a wider nato operation, and a great deal of work is being done in nato to deliver that coordination. >> thanks. >> i want the to ask along the table, are we seriously led to believe that on the january the 1st, 2015, that the afghan national security forces will be susta
blumenthal and i asked the f.d.a. commissioner to meet with us to personally meet with us after thanksgiving to discuss the steps the f.d.a. is taking to ensure the safety of energy drinks. every other week we're seeing mounting evidence that energy drinks pose safety risks. you learn about young people hospitalized or seriously hurt after consuming what are marketed as little energy pick pick-me-ups. we look forward to working with commissioner hamburg to protect our children and to protect everyone in america from these die tear supplements, whether it is 5-hour energy or the monster energy drink which led to the death of this 14-year-old girl in maryland. mr. president, it's been many years since came to this floor and argued about dietary supplements. we all know what's involved here. i always preface my remarks by saying when i got up this morning i took my vitamin, i took my fish oil pill. i believe i should have the right to do that. i don't know p it helps, but i think it does. but when it comes to dietary supplements that go beyond that type of supplement, the things that include dr
cain's campaign and a lawyer at kaplan and drysdale. [audio difficulty] >> -- way for us, which is -- [applause] [audio difficulty] >> the colbert superpac. [laughter] so he's been on colbert many, many times, and this little segment is colbert handing off his pac to john mccain, all of which -- according to trevor -- to jon stewart, is perfectly legal. all right. cue the tape. >> can i run for president and keep my superpac? don't sugar coat it. >> no. >> okay. that's a little less sugar than i was hoping for. [laughter] >> you could have it run by somebody else. >> wait, what? what? someone else can take it over? >> yes. but someone who you would not be coordinating with in terms of pac ads and strategy. >> oh, trevor, i wouldn't want to even create the appearance of electoral skull dug erie, if that's a word i can say on a family show. [laughter] but i think, i think there may be a guy. jon? jon stewart, everybody! trevor, if you will, colbert superpac transfer activate. [laughter] [cheers and applause] >> colbert, colbert, colbert superpac is dead. [laughter] >> but it has been reborn. [lau
some cures and some scientific breakthroughs, like jim was talking about, that would move us beyond just saying we're going to have to cut medicare by $10 trillion over the next 50 years. >> i'm going to let jonathan respond and then i will let each panelist say when prediction on what they see ahead. jonathan. >> the question becomes do people want to work together. and politically if we think we can do better by opposing everything, you oppose everything. and politically think you can do better by working out deals the way gingrich and republican-led congress worked out deals with bill clinton. they will work that. as a matter of both sides willing to come to the table and give-and-take. >> so that was a very fast. like a journalist. version of what's going on. stand, predictions? >> i think the surprise -- surprise. maybe what happens with health care. health care reform and implantation of health care reform. because we talked about this as if there isn't other people. there are so many people who are in either in the process of or have to make decisions about going forward on h
"everything bad is good for you: how today's popular culture is actually making us smarter", he writes the great unsung story of our culture today is how many welcome trends are going up. anthony in san antonio, texas. you are on booktv with steven johnson. >> caller: good morning, mr. johnson. let me just say what a distinct pleasure it is to talk to you. i want to say in 2005, i was a counselor educator and i taught a continuing education class counselors throughout the san antonio community. believe me, i used your book, the looks were bewilderment and total aggravation. the title freak them out. learning is prefigured. the kids were teaching me. i didn't know anything about computers. how are we going to use it to guard against plagiarism? this had nothing to do with it. the resistance, as the time went on, and when i wrote my little blurb on amazon at 11 responses, only two people agreed with it. so this resistance among practitioners had to be tremendous. when the little kid wrote the iphone initiative about two or three years ago, and i played that in one of my classes, the ones
was talking about it gets us to solve that problem over a period of ten years. i thought ten years was too long basically. that was not an endorsement of every single item in the budget but the direction is going in, and whether or not i would support cutting if i supported that the budget i don't know. i have to look at the budget and see what cuts are necessary, but the most important point to remember is this. half of the budget is reform of the tax code to get the economy flat in the tax rates, lower the rates or on the base deutsch a trillion dollars of credits and the major corporations might take advantage to get the economy going and get revenues back up, get people back to work and you have less need for these programs and if it was to save the country to do it in a responsible way. >> i will get to it in a moment i'm not putting your words in your mouth. i want to understand in the short term over the next year or two would you cut the liheap funding of? diamondstone: if i were in the senate today i would spend as much money as i could get without breaking the back of the budget
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14